Sometimes I wonder if anyone is listening to what I have to say and even contemplate that the drone industry might be just passing me by when I hear all of
the supposed good drone news.

Then I sit back for about 30 seconds and say these people must be f#$king crazy.

Can they really be that stupid, or is the money they are fleecing people out of enough to throw the majority of moral qualms right out the window? I’m going with the latter; the shysters (some without a license) and hucksters are the ones raking it in.

The UAS symposium is a way for the FAA to help “educate” the unwashed masses, but how much of that gate fee will pay the Big Wynne’s $500k a year salary?

Then there are the federal employees who are well on their way to vested government retirements and a lucrative private-sector consultant righting the wrongs they created. Golly, this guy sounds cynical. Didn’t he hear they are delivering potato chips and lattes by drone? I know you guys are saving the world at a loss while the FAA fiddles and burns through a planeload of money, but I am not impressed.

  1. Why is the price of an online symposium that other federal administrations like NASA hold for free?
  2. Has there ever been an accounting of the profits/costs for the FAA UAS symposium by AUVSI, and will it be made public?
  3. Has it ever occurred to anyone that the FAA can’t host their own UAS symposium, but we are supposed to go along with the NAS integration charade without question?
  4. Is AUVSI still offering “sponsored” one on one meeting with FA employees?
  5. Are there any ethical issues with paid access to federal employees?
  6. Didn’t AUVSI get in trouble for offering paid access to government employees
    for the test sites? As I recall, federal employees couldn’t attend the secret member
    meeting?
  7. Who amongst the presenters has a valid Part 107 certificate?
  8. How many of the presenters missed the part 91.403(b) maintenance exemption for agricultural application operations?
  9. Who at the FAA is responsible for oversight on those exemptions?
  10. Has the DOT been made aware of the oversight error?
  11. How many RID cohorts are now on the DAC?
  12. Many qualified people, some with recommendations, were passed over; how were the newest members of the DAC chosen?
  13. Did the FAA check with the FCC about location feature issues with RID, or did the FAA just go with what members of the “expert” cohort patented?
  14. What is the estimate on the time delay the RID debacle will cost the domestic drone industry?
  15. How much money is earmarked currently for regulatory enforcement?
  16. Estimated costs to change all of the existing regulatory nomenclatures to gender-neutral nomenclature?
  17. Time estimate it will take to change all of the nomenclature?
  18. Where will the money come from?
  19. Drone delivery (file and fly), two to three years away, five to seven years, ten years plus, 2047?
  20. Why does it take three years to complete simple FOIA requests like personnel rosters?

Enjoy the crumbs. @TheDroneDealer on Twitter

By Patrick Egan

Editor in Field, sUAS News Americas Desk | Patrick Egan is the editor of the Americas Desk at sUAS News and host and Executive Producer of the sUAS News Podcast Series, Drone TV and the Small Unmanned Systems Business Exposition. Experience in the field includes assignments with the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command Battle Lab investigating solutions on future warfare research projects. Instructor for LTA (Lighter Than Air) ISR systems deployment teams for an OSD, U.S. Special Operations Command, Special Surveillance Project. Built and operated commercial RPA prior to 2007 FAA policy clarification. On the airspace integration side, he serves as director of special programs for the RCAPA (Remote Control Aerial Photography Association).